CREED PAGE

The Nicean Creed is the profession of Orthodox Christian beliefs. It was set into writing during the First and Second Ecumenical Councils of the Church.

 

 

THE CREED

I believe in one God, the Father Almighty, Maker of heaven and earth, and of all things visible and invisible;

And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the Son of God, the only begotten, Begotten of the Father before all worlds,

Light of Light, very God of very God, begotten, not made, of one essence with the Father; by whom all things were made; who for us men and for our salvation came down from Heaven, and was incarnate of the Holy Spirit and the virgin Mary, and was made man;

And was crucified for us under Pontius Pilate; and suffered and was buried;

And on the third day He rose again according to the Scriptures,

And ascended in Heaven, and sitteth at the right hand of the Father;

And He shall come again, with glory, to judge he quick and the dead; whose kingdom shall have no end.

And I believe in the Holy Spirit, the Lord, and Giver of Life, who proceeds from the Father; who with the Father and the Son together is worshiped and glorified; who spoke by the Prophets.

And I believe in one Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church; I acknowledge one Baptism for the remission of sins; and I look for the Resurrection of the dead, and the Life of the world to come. Amen.

 



Following is a line by line analysis of the Creed, showing that what the Orthodox Christians believe is found in the Scriptures and is part of the Bible

 

I believe in (Romans 10: 8-10; 1 John 4: 15)

One God, (Deuteronomy 6: 4, Ephesians 4: 6)

Father (Matthew 6: 9)

Almighty, (Exodus 6: 3)

Maker of Heaven and Earth, (Genesis 1: 1)

and of all things visible and invisible. (Colossians 1: 15-16)

And in ONE Lord Jesus Christ, (Acts 11: 17)

the Son of God, (Mathew 14: 33; 16: 16)

the Only-Begotten, (John 1: 18; 3: 16)

Begotten of the Father before all worlds. (John 1: 2)

Light of Light; (Psalm 27: 1; John 8: 12; Matthew 17: 2,5)

Very God of very God; (John 17: 1-5)

Begotten, not made; (John 1: 18)

of one essence with the Father (John 10: 30)

by whom all things were made; (Hebrews 1: 1-2)

Who for us men and for our salvation (1 Timothy 2: 4-5)

came down from heaven, (John 6: 33,35)

and was incarnate of the Holy Spirit and the Virgin Mary (Luke 1: 35)

and became man. (John 1: 14)

And was crucified for us (Mark 15: 25; 1 Corinthians 15: 3)

under Pontius Pilate, (John 19: 6)

and suffered, (Mark 8: 31)

and was buried. (Luke 23: 53; 1 Corinthians 15: 4)

And on the third day He rose again, according to the Scriptures, (Luke 24: 1 1 Corinthians 15: 4)

and ascended in heaven, (Luke 24: 51; Acts 1: 10)

and sitteth at the right hand of the Father; (Mark 16: 19; Acts 7: 55)

and He shall come again with glory (Matthew 24: 27)

to judge the quick and the dead; (Acts 10: 42; 2 Timothy 4:1)

Whose Kingdom shall have no end. (2 Peter 1: 11)

And I believe in the Holy Spirit, (John 14: 26)

the Lord, (Acts 5: 3-4)

and the Giver of Life, (Genesis 1: 2)

Who proceedeth from the Father; (John 15: 26)

Who with the Father and the Son together is worshipped and glorified; (Matthew 3: 16-17)

Who spoke through the prophets. (1 Samuel 19: 20; Ezekiel 11: 5,13)

And I believe In One, (Matthew 16: 18)

Holy, (1 Peter 2: 5,9)

Catholic, (Mark 16: 15)

and Apostolic Church. (Acts 2: 42; Ephesians 2: 19-22)

I acknowledge one baptism for the remission of sins. (Ephesians 4: 5)

I look for the resurrection of the dead, (John 11: 24; 1 Corinthians 15: 12-49; Hebrews 6: 2; Revelation 20: 5)

and the life of the world to come. (Mark 10: 29-30)

AMEN. (Psalm 106: 48)

Icon depicting Emperor Constantine (center) and the Fathers of the First Council of Nicaea (325) as holding the Niceno–Constantinopolitan Creed of 381.
The creeds of Christianity have been drawn up at times of conflict about doctrine: acceptance or rejection of a creed served to distinguish believers and deniers of a particular doctrine or set of doctrines. The Nicene Creed was adopted in the face of the Arian controversy. Arius, a Libyan preacher, had declared that although Jesus Christ was divine, God had actually created him, and "there was when he was not," also worded by others of the era "there was once when he was not" and "he was made out of nothing." This made Jesus less than the Father and contradicted the doctrine of the Trinity. Arius's teaching provoked a serious crisis.
The Nicene Creed of 325 explicitly affirms the divinity of Jesus, applying to him the term "God". The 381 version speaks of the Holy Spirit as worshipped and glorified with the Father and the Son.

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